4 thoughts on “Swing Shift, Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter, Can She Bake a Cherry Pie?, Privates on Parade, 1984

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    March 24, 2019 at 3:23 pm
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    Strange show. Whenever they weren’t disagreeing, Gene had to deliver sedatives to Roger during the Friday the 13th segment. I mean, really! The only message these Friday the 13th movies have is to MAKE MONEY! They have nothing to do with delivering messages about the world being hopeless! Roger probably inadvertently increased attendance to these movies with these excessively emotional commentaries.

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      January 11, 2021 at 10:00 am
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      First Gene used personal information in his review of the first film. Now Roger acts like a conservative Christian who scapegoats Dungeons and Dragons.

      • Daniel g Daniel g
        March 6, 2021 at 8:57 pm
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        That wasn’t his point. His point was that all the Friday the 13th movies up to that point were nothing but an exercise in how to stick and kill someone and people were flocking to see them like they better than say a wholesome movie like Swing Shift for example. Also by this point, they both were absolutely dead tired of slasher films and if you look back at their shows up to this point, they reviewed virtually every slasher or horror film that came out almost every week and if I was a critic (which I was at one point), I’d get sick and tired of them too. It’s not to say that they didn’t like a well done one like Halloween which they raved about until all the copycat or rip offs came out after mercilessly in the years after 1978. Why do you think they also went after Silent Night, Deadly Night when that came out and after seeing that, I had agree with them on that one because it was a cheap thriller that doesn’t compare to Friday the 13th in any sense and makes that film look like a horror masterpiece. You can’t fault Ebert for feeling this way about the film while I do agree that he as usually did most times, overact too much. Give him credit for being passionate about his love of movies.

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