2 thoughts on “Sneakers, Where the Day Takes You, Husbands and Wives, Wind, Swoon, 1992

  • June 17, 2021 at 6:33 pm
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    OK now here’s your classic Siskel & Ebert situation: After Gene passed away, Ebert said of him that he thought Gene had to like the entire movie to give it a thumbs-up, something Roger did not have a problem with (he said). This seemed to be often the case, but here’s Gene liking enough of Sneakers to “give it a marginal thumbs-up,” whereas Roger is the one giving it a marginal thumbs-down, but saying he liked “some scenes of the movie.” It appears that both of these men were human beings, often tripping over their own rules and pronouncements in order to justify the fact that they simply liked or disliked a movie, just because they felt that way.

  • June 17, 2021 at 6:53 pm
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    “Of course the most explosive element in the movie is when Woody Allen’s character, a college English professor, begins having an affair with a student.” And there Gene betrays, I think, a presumption about Allen that people have been having for 30 years now. I don’t know what he thought about the allegations against Woody Allen, but he gets a huge part of the plot wrong here: Allen’s character does NOT have an affair with Juliette Lewis’s character, they kiss once at a party, nothing else. Not something he or Roger often do.

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