12 thoughts on “Darkman, The Witches, Wild at Heart, Pump Up the Volume, My Blue Heaven, 1990

  • January 20, 2019 at 3:39 pm
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    Love me some Darkman, classic Raimi.

    Wild at Heart is Lynch in rare form, but definitely a film I have to be in the mood for.

    Pump up the Jam is another fave. One of the more poignant teen flicks of the time.

    Was never a Steve Martin fan, but I found him extra annoying in My Blue Heaven.

    • March 23, 2019 at 7:56 am
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      I agreed with Siskel and Ebert. I liked “Darkman” a lot. Liam Neeson was terrific as Peyton Westlake, and Larry Drake was was so well-cast as Durant. I liked “Dick Tracy” too, the best detective movie ever. Thumbs up for me.

      Darkman 4/4 👍👍

  • March 23, 2019 at 3:20 am
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    Only thing about My Blue Heaven is my cousin did the score for that crap film. People ignored it in theaters and that was a good thing. It was just a sitcom film.

    • March 23, 2019 at 11:12 am
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      I am a fan of your cousin Ira’s music, such as for the Naked Gun series. Thanks for sharing your story!

      • November 28, 2020 at 4:39 am
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        Thanks a lot. And he also did Planes, Trains, and Automobiles, which is running a lot right now for Thanskgiving.

    • November 28, 2020 at 5:02 am
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      Special show. They did a lot of them in the summertime back then. Probably to fill episodes since there weren’t as many movies to review. In the later years, they didn’t have to do that.

  • November 26, 2020 at 3:32 pm
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    I was Darkman for Halloween that year. No one got it. I kept getting “Are you suppose to be the mummy?” I love that movie, highly underrated.

    • November 28, 2020 at 4:40 am
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      I could see the confusion. Darkman did do well though, from what I recall.

  • May 28, 2021 at 6:22 pm
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    Roger Ebert’s one-man war against David Lynch continues. I didn’t realize how much he disliked Lynch’s style; he’s always juxtaposed violence with humor. Think of Bob from Twin Peaks: terrifying or hilarious? Both, in my opinion, showing that there’s a very thin line between the two. Ebert sure didn’t care for his work, though. Wow.

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